Let Fury Have The Hour:

Joe Strummer, Punk, and The Movement

That Shook The World

 

Essays, Photographs, and Edited by

Antonino D’Ambrosio

 

 

 

“[A] potent collection [that] ably communicates the hunger for social, cultural
and racial justice that made Strummer’s work so engaging.” —Salon

Antonino D’Ambrosio’s film LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR was inspired by essays from his book
Let Fury Have the Hour: Joe Strummer, Punk and the Movement that Shook the World.

The politics of citizenship have never been more contested. This year’s election left the nation more divided, and illustrated how broken the political system really has become. LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR: Joe Strummer, Punk, and the Movement that Shook the World (Nation Books; March 6, 2012; Trade Paperback Reprint/Movie Tie-in Edition) emphasizes the power of creative expression to impact change and refocus citizenship debates away from consumerism and partisan division and back on our basic humanity and well-being.

The re-release of LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR, with new chapters and a tie-in to the film, is a fascinating, lyrical collection of essays that cross into mixed media, collage, street art, illustrations and music. Antonino D’Ambrosio presents a series of essays, interviews, photos, lyrics, and other art forms that chronicle Joe Strummer’s life and the indelible impact he made on the world through music and activism. This updated edition includes new chapters that stress the importance of freedom of expression as a means of overcoming the insistence of consumerism over citizenship. His new chapters and new film emphasize the struggle to overcome the harmful reactionary politics implanted during the reins of Reagan and Thatcher. These disturbing trends continue to divide the nation and much of the world.

“I think people ought to know that we’re anti-fascist, we’re anti-violence, we’re anti-racist and we’re pro-creative. We’re against ignorance.” —Joe Strummer, 1976

When Joe Strummer died unexpectedly at age fifty in 2002, the world lost one of its foremost citizen artists. A truly unique voice in modern music, over the course of his career Strummer strove to use creativity and art to send a powerful political message and effect positive change in the world. As the front man for the Clash, he wrote songs that criticized what he saw as the evils of capitalism and imperialism, and championed causes such as racial justice—more than mere music, Strummer’s punk rock was a loud, raucous protest of the status quo. In LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR: Joe Strummer, Punk, and the Movement that Shook the World (Nation Books; March 6, 2012; Trade Paperback Reprint/Movie Tie-in Edition)—updated from the 2004 edition with two new opening chapters—Antonino D’Ambrosio presents a series of essays, interviews, photos, lyrics, and other art forms that chronicle Strummer’s life and the indelible impact he made on the world through music and activism.

The eclectic combination of D’Ambrosio’s own essays and photos, original art by Shepard Fairey, and pieces by a diverse array of contributors makes LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR a unique work. It is a thorough and wide-ranging demonstration of Joe Strummer’s influence. Included among the essays are:

“The Very Angry Clash” by Steve Walsh – an interview from 1976 with three members of the Clash – Strummer, Mick Jones, and Paul Simonon – about politics, apathy, and the meaning of their music.

“The Clash Legacy” by Tom Morello – the speech given by Morello at the induction of the Clash into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003.

“Strange Bedfellows: How the Clash Inspired Public Enemy” by Chuck D – a piece by the groundbreaking rapper about the common ground between hip-hop and punk and the importance of fearless and politically outspoken musicians.

In the updated edition’s new chapters, which mirror the new film, D’Ambrosio elaborates on idea of Creative Response, a main point of his new feature-length documentary. The book expands from focus on individuals to worldwide movements supporting freedom of expression and the rejection of status quo politics.

LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR is an intimate portrait of a hugely influential artist as well as an exploration of his far-reaching influence. This collection presented by D’Ambrosio provides a singular take on the powerful effects that truly meaningful art can have on individuals and on a global scale.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Antonino D’Ambrosio is a writer, filmmaker, musician, and visual artist. His book A Heartbeat and a Guitar: Johnny Cash and the Making of Bitter Tears was nominated for the Belmont Book Award. D’Ambrosio’s film work includes No Free Lunch starring comedian Lewis Black. D’Ambrosio’s writing has appeared in the Nation, Progressive, Salon, Believer, among many others. D’Ambrosio is also the founder of La Lutta NMC (www.lalutta.org), a production and new media nonprofit. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR:
Joe Strummer, Punk, and The Movement That Shook The World

Essays, Photographs, and Edited by Antonino D’Ambrosio

Published by Nation Books

Publication Date: March 6, 2012

Trade Paperback Reprint; Movie Tie-in Edition

$17.99 (US)   $21.00 (CAN)  •  416 pages

ISBN: 978-1-568-58719-6

Ebook ISBN: 978-1-568-58720-2

Originally published in November 2004

For more information on the book LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR, please visit www.nationbooks.com or follow us on Twitter at @NationBooks